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14/Mar/2018

Patient ID Card Update

Photo ID’s Link with DMV

The Medical Marijuana Use Registry (MMUR) is now linked to the Division of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicle’s State ID system. If there is a match to the demographic information (SSN & Date of Birth) supplied by a Qualified Ordering Physician, the State ID or Driver’s License photo for the patient or caregiver is automatically populated to their online application!

A full-face, passport-type, color photograph taken within the last 90 days. Passport-type photos must be must be color, clear, with a full front view of your face, with a plain white background. The photograph must be taken in normal street attire, without a hat, head covering, or glasses.

Now You Can Pay Online!

The Medical Marijuana Use Registry (MMUR) has been updated to accept online payments for Patient and Caregiver applications. If a check has already been mailed, a duplicate payment should not be made online. New to the online application is the “Click here to Pay Online” button!

A full-face, passport-type, color photograph taken within the last 90 days. Passport-type photos must be must be color, clear, with a full front view of your face, with a plain white background. The photograph must be taken in normal street attire, without a hat, head covering, or glasses.

Now You Can Pay Online!

The Medical Marijuana Use Registry (MMUR) has been updated to accept online payments for Patient and Caregiver applications. If a check has already been mailed, a duplicate payment should not be made online. New to the online application is the “Click here to Pay Online” button!

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  • Must be a new ReleafMD patient

  • Those who are referred and mention your name and this website will receive a 5% off
  • Offer ends July 31st 2018

Ask Florida Medical Doctor for more details…

To get started on your Florida MMJ Card schedule an appointment at ReleafMD.com.


07/Mar/2018

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#5.) Helps Treat PTSD

It’s estimated that 8 percent of Americans (24.4 million people) currently suffer from PTSD. To put things into perspective, this number is equal to the size of Texas.

PTSD can include symptoms such as agitation, severe anxiety, depression insomnia, nightmares, and social isolation – it can be a crippling condition.

Yet, THC has shown to be a highly effective treatment option. Some psychiatrist say that THC-rich cannabis is the only treatment. In fact, studies have confirmed that THC eases a variety of PTSD-related symptoms including agitation, depression insomnia, flashbacks, and nightmares.

This means that for those suffering from PTSD, they can finally get the peaceful sleep they need to heal and regain balance in their lives. All they need is access to safe cannabis and guidance on how to best implement it into their lives.

#6.) Promotes Brain Growth

Believe it or not, the medical benefits of THC for the brain may be even bigger than we thought. Not only does THC protect brain cells, it also stimulates brain growth.

How does it work?

THC activates the “CB1 receptor” in our brains. This stimulation promotes a process known as long-term potentiation which improves the brain’s ability to learn.

Scientists also discovered that like CBD, THC causes brain cells in the hippocampus to grow.

Some research even suggests that THC can protect spatial memories.

This is why small doses of cannabis can treat or even prevent diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

If that weren’t enough, we also have a study showing people with THC in their systems are 80% more likely to survive head trauma!


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28/Feb/2018

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#3.) Protects Brain Cells

Reefer madness led a lot of people to believe that cannabis consumption kills brain cells. However, the reality is this could not be further from the truth.

While most drugs are neurotoxic, THC is considered to be neuroprotectant. Which means that it actually protects brain cells from damage.

Here’s a mind-blowing example a study in 2014 found that people with THC in their systems were 80 percent less likely to die from traumatic head injuries than those without.

Mind-blowing, right?

#4.) Effective Sleep Aid

Have trouble sleeping? Research shows that THC health benefits play a role here as well.

Trials in the 1970s found that oral doses of THC helped insomniacs fall asleep faster. And that’s not all. Recent research suggests THC may also improve breathing while reducing sleep interruptions.

Great news for those suffering from conditions such as sleep apnea!


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22/Feb/2018

Do we really need THC – the most widely recognized component of cannabis?

This is the same compound that produces the “high” in cannabis. It has generated more than its fair share of critics, and many believe that THC has no medicinal value at all.

Yet, science has demonstrated this is far from the case.

THC in conjuction with other cannabinoids has shown to help people deal with mental and physical ailments.

Not to mention many people find THC-rich products – when taken at just the right dosage – to be an effective supplement towards their everyday health.

Just check out these 8 health benefits of THC.

#1.) Provides Pain Relief

Pain relief is one of the top medical benefits of THC, and I’ll tell you why…

More than 1.5 billion people worldwide live with chronic pain. Many of these individuals suffer from neuropathic pain, or nerve-related pain.

Studies show that THC activates pathways in the central nervous system that block pain signals from being sent to the brain.

Even an FDA-approved trial in 2013 confirmed THC’s effectiveness for pain relief. Individuals experiencing neuropathic pain were given low doses of THC (1.29%) in the form of vaporized cannabis. The results?

“A low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol provided statistically significant 30% reductions in pain intensity when compared to placebo.”

While clinical research continues to be restricted due to cannabis’s regretful status as a schedule one controlled substance – it is clear that a positive correlation exists between THC and pain relief.

#2.) Eases Nausea & Vomiting

Did you know that a FDA-approved THC pill (Marinol) for treating nausea and vomiting in cancer patients has been around since the 1980s?

In fact, Marinol has been marketed as a pharmaceutical alternative to cannabis.

However, while Marinol does contain delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the compound is both synthetic and isolated. Which means that it pales in comparison to the chemical compounds found in natural, whole-plant cannabis.

Marinol does not include beneficial components such as other cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids.

Interestingly, a study in 1995 revealed that oral doses of THC-8, a cannabinoid like the regular THC but with lower psychotropic effects, were an effective treatment for children suffering from chemotherapy-induced nausea. The only side effects found was slight irritability.

Considering that other nausea medications such as Zofran can lead to side effects like: diarrhea, headache, drowsiness, blurred vision, muscle spasms, rash, fever, and constipation just to name a few.

THC-based therapies are a much safer option.


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12/Oct/2017

ZEPHYRHILLS, Fla. – An elderly woman suffering from Parkinson’s Disease who was prescribed medical marijuana by her physician was denied her medication by the staff of her nursing home. Charlotte Simpson, who is in a wheelchair, lives at the Zephyrhills Health and Rehab Center which is owned by Florida Hospital.

Her son, Bert Green said that his mother had applied for a compassionate use permit after suffering from excruciating pain and severe shaking that was uncontrollable. He stated that the nursing home gave him the medical marijuana once it was delivered and advised him that they would not administer the drug to Simpson. They told him that he would have to take the medicine home with him.

The news has sparked a discussion about how Florida health professionals will handle medical marijuana in nursing homes and rehab facilities. A spokesperson from the nursing homes said that they have to balance the state law with federal laws.

The Vice President of the University of South Florida Healthcare Jay Wolfson says that even the law allows medical marijuana therapy, the nursing home doesn’t have to permit it and that it may take time to figure out a solution.

In the meantime, Greene says that his mother was devastated by the news that the nursing home will not give her the marijuana. She thought she was finally going to get some relief from her painful symptoms. He says that his mother is in bad condition and that she also suffers from arthritis and several other illnesses.

A 2014 study by the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health found that 30 minutes after smoking cannabis, patients with Parkinson’s Disease showed significant relief from symptoms with no adverse side effects. Prescription drugs for Parkinson’s Disease include blurred vision, heartburn, diarrhea, vomiting, insomnia, muscle pain and cold symptoms


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21/Aug/2017

How Do I Qualify to Be a Medical Marijuana Patient?

Any individual suffering from a serious or chronic medical condition in which other traditional measures and medicines have not been effective can see a qualifying health care professional who can write a recommendation for medical marijuana as part of ongoing treatment of the patient’s terminal or debilitating condition. You can get a recommendation for California at www.ReleafMD.com The physician, after completing a physical examination and documenting the medical condition in the patient’s record, will provide a written recommendation stating the patient would benefit from treatment using medical marijuana.

A recommendation is different than a doctor’s prescription that could be filled at a pharmacy. Cannabis is classified by the federal government as a Schedule I drug and therefore doctors are not allowed to prescribe it, but they can supply patients with medical marijuana recommendations that comply with state law, allowing patients to either buy from a dispensary or supplier or grow themselves, in specified quantities.

Besides having a medical marijuana recommendation by a state licensed health care professional, some states also require that you show proof of residency and be 18 years or older. If you are under 18, a parent or guardian must accompany you.


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15/Jun/2017

This guide is intended to help patients who are new to using cannabis therapeutically to treat a medical condition. Topics covered include the following:

  • Qualifications to become a medical marijuana patient
  • Conditions treatable with medical marijuana
  • Health care providers who can legally recommend marijuana
  • Steps to take after receiving a cannabis recommendation
  • What is a medical marijuana card
  • Why you should get a medical marijuana card

For starters, it’s important to know that many terms are used for cannabis, yet all generally mean the same thing: marijuana (used interchangeably with cannabis throughout this article and the United Patients Group site), weed, pot, ganja, and herb, just to name a few.

If you have a medical condition that is not being effectively treated with traditional drugs or therapeutic interventions, your doctor may recommend or you may be considering using cannabis for pain and symptom relief. Many questions come up for new patients. Here we will cover all of the basic ones. If you still have questions, check out the resource section of our website or feel free to contact us directly.

How Do I Qualify to Be a Medical Marijuana Patient?

Any individual suffering from a serious or chronic medical condition in which other traditional measures and medicines have not been effective can see a qualifying health care professional who can write a recommendation for medical marijuana as part of ongoing treatment of the patient’s terminal or debilitating condition. The physician, after completing a physical examination and documenting the medical condition in the patient’s record, will provide a written recommendation stating the patient would benefit from treatment using medical marijuana.

A recommendation is different than a doctor’s prescription that could be filled at a pharmacy. Cannabis is classified by the federal government as a Schedule I drug and therefore doctors are not allowed to prescribe it, but they can supply patients with medical marijuana recommendations that comply with state law, allowing patients to either buy from a dispensary or supplier or grow themselves, in specified quantities.

Besides having a medical marijuana recommendation by a state licensed health care professional, some states also require that you show proof of residency and be 18 years or older. If you are under 18, a parent or guardian must accompany you.


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Dr. Kelly Ennix King is a licensed medical cannabis physician in Florida and California.

Copyright by RELEAFMD 2021. All rights reserved.

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